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  1. #1
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    trickshot17 is offline

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    Anyone know how Blacksmithing scoring works? (need specifics)

    I am making/revising a blacksmithing bot that I made, and I'm wondering if there are ways I can improve on my scoring algo (a bot is only as good as its scoring algo) . Here is my general scoring scheme (taken from different people's blacksmithing guides):

    Saving your wild for the last layer> Most medium sized ComboChains
    ComboChains > Single Combos
    SingleCombos>Placement of the first piece for the next layer
    Single Combos> repeated hits on the same piece type
    repeated hits> random spaghetti moves all over the place with no combos of anytype

    However, there's not much information on what the break-even points are. For instance, how many single combos is equal in score to one double combo (ferrus)?
    Video
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6DPt...ature=youtu.be

    If this is in the wrong section, I won't feel bad if it gets moved. Performancewise, I don't strictly need the bot to play better because it already achieves a very easy ultimate, but I just want to know if there is even more room for improvement. For those who want to know if its for sale, its not, and there is no ETA on completion as far as purchasability goes.
    Last edited by trickshot17; 01-31-2013 at 10:30 PM.

  2. #2
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    Scarecrow is offline

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    A lot of "Scoring" in puzzles is based off speculation, so you're unlikely to find a correct answer. The aim, I believe, In blacksmith is to perform perfect boards (and if possible to make combos along the way as a "bonus" of sorts). If you can complete a full board or have 1 piece left you get an Incredible, 2 pieces left is an excellent. (That's just a random guess, it's been a while since I've played YPP socially when I'm not testing something).

    I think the best way to get a high score in blacksmith statwise would be to calculate a perfect clear of the top layer, if it does not have a perfect clear then to leave and find a new board. (Then see how the rest of the layers go).

    Just out of curiosity, what language are you programming this in?

  3. #3
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    trickshot17 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scarecrow View Post
    A lot of "Scoring" in puzzles is based off speculation, so you're unlikely to find a correct answer. The aim, I believe, In blacksmith is to perform perfect boards (and if possible to make combos along the way as a "bonus" of sorts). If you can complete a full board or have 1 piece left you get an Incredible, 2 pieces left is an excellent. (That's just a random guess, it's been a while since I've played YPP socially when I'm not testing something).

    I think the best way to get a high score in blacksmith statwise would be to calculate a perfect clear of the top layer, if it does not have a perfect clear then to leave and find a new board. (Then see how the rest of the layers go).

    Just out of curiosity, what language are you programming this in?
    I'm talking about preferring certain solutions over others when both fully clear the board. Combos are already considered a "secondary" objective by the program.

    The program is in C++

  4. #4
    #Return
    Scarecrow is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by trickshot17 View Post
    I'm talking about preferring certain solutions over others when both fully clear the board. Combos are already considered a "secondary" objective by the program.

    The program is in C++
    Oh fair enough, misunderstood what you were on about. Can't help ya there sorry :P

    Impressive you're doing it in C++ though.

  5. #5
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    trickshot17 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scarecrow View Post
    Oh fair enough, misunderstood what you were on about. Can't help ya there sorry :P

    Impressive you're doing it in C++ though.
    Word on the street is that other languages are better for it, but I figure the fact that most of the work in blacksmithing is just calculation, and that I haven't really dove into the HMM-land has made C++ adequate for the job.

  6. #6
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    Sage Man is offline

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    Your scoring is wonky but w/e. BS is the easiest puzzle scoring other than rigging.

    Score boils down to # of pieces hit. The more hit the higher the score. The only way to score well in competitions is to on the first board hit as many alternating set combos as possible then MP the board.

    There isn't much to say about scoring tbh it's pretty straight foreward.

  7. #7
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    Kandor is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by trickshot17 View Post
    Word on the street is that other languages are better for it, but I figure the fact that most of the work in blacksmithing is just calculation, and that I haven't really dove into the HMM-land has made C++ adequate for the job.
    #Umber was in C++

    R.ita I.s P.erfect

  8. #8
    #Return
    Scarecrow is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kandor View Post
    #Umber was in C++
    Was under the impression it was half C#/C++

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    trickshot17 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage Man View Post
    Your scoring is wonky but w/e. BS is the easiest puzzle scoring other than rigging.

    Score boils down to # of pieces hit. The more hit the higher the score. The only way to score well in competitions is to on the first board hit as many alternating set combos as possible then MP the board.

    There isn't much to say about scoring tbh it's pretty straight foreward.
    "MPing" the board is already the top priority of the program. However, the program will often find many many many solutions, and it only really makes sense to use the highest scoring one. So for that, I need to know more about the scoring than just whether it finished the board, and with what level alternating combo, because otherwise it would only output the first solution it found (and from experience, its rarely the best one).

    Finishing board>chains>singlecombos>repeats>spaghetti

    Right now, each thing to the left is worth a lot more to the program than anything to the right (finishing the board is considered mandatory if possible). I'm not convinced that my assumption is 100% true however.

  10. #10
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    Sage Man is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by trickshot17 View Post
    "MPing" the board is already the top priority of the program. However, the program will often find many many many solutions, and it only really makes sense to use the highest scoring one. So for that, I need to know more about the scoring than just whether it finished the board, and with what level alternating combo, because otherwise it would only output the first solution it found (and from experience, its rarely the best one).

    Finishing board>chains>singlecombos>repeats>spaghetti

    Right now, each thing to the left is worth a lot more to the program than anything to the right (finishing the board is considered mandatory if possible). I'm not convinced that my assumption is 100% true however.
    You did not read my post.

    Scoring=Hit most possible.

    Watch any blacksmithing video on youtube or even watch the videos of the blacksmithing bot...

    You program should do this and only this.

    Find as many alternating sets without hitting a piece more than once>Work on hitting as many more pieces as possible only once before calculation level 2> same as level 1 until there are no more pieces to hit once, calculate for level 3>complete board towards a MP

    Rinse and repeat

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